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Sugar-based collagen membrane cross-linking increases barrier capacity of membranes

Clin. Oral Invest.,  (2017)

Po-ju Chia-LaiAnna OrlowskaSarah Al-MaawiAndre DiasYunxin ZhangXuejiu WangNiklas ZenderRobert SaderC. James KirkpatrickShahram Ghanaati

This study examines the permeability and barrier capacity of a sugar cross-linked resorbable collagen membrane ex vivo and in vivo. In an ex vivo study, injectable platelet-rich fibrin (i-PRF), a peripheral blood-derived human leukocyte-and-platelet-rich plasma was used to analyze membrane permeability. in vivo subcutaneous implantation in Wistar rats (n = 4 per time point and group) was used to investigate the barrier capacity of the membrane. The induced in vivo cellular reaction was evaluated at 3, 15, and 30 days and compared to sham OP (control) without biomaterial using histological, immunohistochemical, and histomorphometric methods. Ex vivo, the membrane was impenetrable to leukocytes, platelets, and fibrin from peripheral human blood concentrate (PRF). In vivo, the membrane maintained its structure and remained impervious to cells, connective tissue, and vessels over 30 days. CD-68-positive cell (macrophage) numbers significantly decreased from 3 to 15 days, while from day 15 onwards, the number of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) increased significantly. Correspondingly, a rise in implantation bed vascularization from 15 to 30 days was observed. However, no signs of degradation or material breakdown were observed at any time point. Ex vivo and in vivo results showed material impermeability to cellular infiltration of human and murine cells, which highlights the membrane capacity to serve as a barrier over 30 days. However, whether the induced MNGCs will lead to material degradation or encapsulation over the long term requires further investigation. The data presented are of great clinical interest, as they contribute to the ongoing discussion concerning to what extent an implanted material should be integrated versus serving only as a barrier membrane.

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DOI: 10.1007/s00784-017-2281-1

André Dias

MSCA Early Stage Researcher at the Universitaet Frankfurt, Germany Nanotoxicity and in-vitro investigation of interaction of nanomaterials with living cells. more...

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    Anna Orlowska

    MSCA Early Stage Researcher at the Universitaet Frankfurt, Germany Immune reaction models of biomaterials on living organisms. more...

    Latest posts by Anna Orlowska (see all)

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